You can Major in Social Media

You Can Major In Social Media?

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Social media degree programs have some people a little baffled. It seems strange to read for a degree in social media, why is this strange?

Twitter 101, History of Emojis 305, Snapchat Filters 110, Advanced Hashtagging 201.

These classes may be coming to a college near you – sort of. In the age of Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, social media management degrees are #ForReal as colleges and universities aim to educate students about getting the most from online platforms.

For example, the University of Florida‘s College of Journalism and Communications offers a 38-credit online master’s program in this media category. According to the program’s website, students will “get a deep understanding of how to engage audiences through creative content and impactful messaging strategies.”

 Numerous schools with this media degree offerings focus on providing master’s degrees, mostly through web-based programs with classes in metrics and ethics. The University of Southern California offers a similar master’s program in digital social media from its journalism school.

The degree, according to the program’s website, “teaches you leadership and management of thisd type of media, digital media, and online communities,” and allows students to ” develop expertise in the practice, theory, and strategies that are essential for success in today’s business and social landscape.”

[Use this media to get free cash for college.]

Not all courses, however, are for journalists. At Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey—New Brunswick, one can study for a “Mini-MBA” in social media marketing for the price of $3,495. There, classes focus around analytics and the importance of social media to companies and brands.

Despite more platforms going mainstream, there remains a market for the social savvy job seeker. Job openings for social media positions boomed in 2014 but have since leveled off, representing about seven out of every 10,000 listings on job search engine Indeed.com.

Despite the job prospects, these degrees – and the idea of academic courses devoted to platforms used to post cat videos and food pictures – is a topic of intrigue, skepticism and excitement.

By Darian Somers (http://www.usnews.com/education)